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Debra Sundstrom

I have often stated here that while I obviously do cases that involve the murder of a spouse I have to be in the “mood” to do them to give them the same justice other cases receive by me. This is mainly because these sorts of crimes are almost commonplace in our world right now. While researching this case I read an article published in 2013 that stated that 750 marriages end in murder (by a spouse) every year in America. The article went on to say that 80% of those crimes are committed by the male in the relationship. This may be why a lot of the spousal crimes that I blog about are in the other 20% that are committed by the female. This is one of them.
On February 19, 2013 local Walton New York police officers went to a cabin home owned by the Bosco family. They had gone there looking for Debra Sundstrom. Debra had been dating Dominick “Nick” Bosco for close to a year, but they were not there for anything related to their relationship. No, officers were there to serve a benc…

Brown's Chicken Massacre

If you are a regular reader of my blog you know that they are not always simply about the crime. Sometimes it is about the justice system that includes things like fair trials, evidence presented, and sometimes it is about my opinion in the guilt or innocence of the person or people accused. It was many of this latter things that had me flip-flopping on my feelings on the case throughout the time I was researching this case. In the end however, I believe that it has to be one of those cases that common sense has to come into play when deciding if the correct perpetrators were taken to trial.
Sixteen year old Michael Castro was working at Brown's Chicken and Pasta in Palatine Illinois, a suburb of Chicago, on January 8, 1993. The restaurant had closed at 9 pm but a few hours later he had not returned home and his parents were worried and called the police. A short time later the wife of Guadalupe Maldonado also called the police stating her husband had not returned home and she…

Sandra Rucki

From time to time I will blog about a case that does not involve murder but even if it does not, I am unsure I have blogged about one that was not at least an attempted murder... until now. I could be wrong considering I have blogged nearly five hundred cases but I am pretty sure this one is different. While I have blogged about cases that involve a child custody case, and allegations of abuse but I believe they all ended in either an attempt on a person's life, or a death. That is not the case here. This case is not just the kidnapping of children by a parent, but to also address Parental Alienation which sadly many, including myself have seen first hand.
For those who do not know what parental alienation is, it is the purposeful act of someone, usually a parent, to actively and often successfully “brainwash” a child against their other parent unjustly. This can be done in many ways. It can include things such as threats and intimidation or it can be done through bribery and…

Ruby Klokow

One thing that often bothers me when discussing crimes with the general public is it is often inevitable that someone will look at a crime that happened several decades prior and cannot comprehend how the crime was able to take place without someone stepping in and stopping it beforehand. I have often been chastised in open forum as I try to explain to people that we cannot judge innocent bystanders from decades ago because their way of life was much more different than ours.
One particular case that this issue comes up is the Sylvia Likens case. Sylvia was a sixteen year old girl who was beaten and tortured to death not just by the woman who was being paid to care for her but from the woman's children and even neighborhood children in Indianapolis Indiana in 1965. The woman in the case (I have blogged about this one) was a divorced mother with several children of her own and had taken in Sylvia and her sister. Neighbors heard things such as cries from children and others and s…

Lowell Lee Andrews

I found this case particularly interesting for several reasons. It has been a while since I have read Truman Capote's In Cold Blood but although Andrews was not a prominent character in the book, he was mentioned both there and in the movies because he shared death row with the perpetrators in that book. Another reason I find this case interesting is just the time period itself. Many of the cases around this era were open and shut quickly but by the time Lowell Andrews was convicted in 1958 appeals seemed to take a little longer than they had in the past, although still nothing like they do now. This case began on November 28, 1958 with the murders of William and Opal Andrews and their twenty year old daughter Jennie Marie, and it ended on November 30, 1962 in the execution of Lowell Lee Andrews. And to be fair, this mere four years was considered to be a long time to close during this time.
There are a few other reasons that I found this case interesting. One, was the natur…

Miriam Helmick

In August of 2000 twenty-three year old Amy Giles died in Jacksonville Florida. Amy was the daughter of Jacksonville residents Miriam and Jack Giles. A year and a half later Jack would also die in April of 2002. While I could not definitely determine how Amy had died, Jack's cause of death was a gunshot wound to his head while laying in his bed. Laying next to him was his wife, Miriam. She would tell investigators that Jack had never gotten over the death of their daughter and had suffered from depression. The gun used was said to be one that Jack kept in his nightstand drawer. The gun was found in his hand and it appears that little else was looked at, or collected as would be in a normal crime scene. Jack's death would be ruled a suicide.
Miriam apparently stayed in Florida for at least a while because in 2004 she pleaded guilty to charges related to a “counterfeit check scheme.” It does not seem to have been too serious considering she only spent three days in jail.…

David Viens

Sometimes a case is less about the guilt or innocence of a person and more about the legalities of the trial and the evidence submitted. This is what constitutes that someone gets a “fair” trial. For most prosecutors while one goal is to get as much evidence entered into the court that they can, the other goal is to make sure that evidence is entered properly so that if they obtain the conviction they are looking for there is less reason for a court to overturn a verdict. More often than not verdicts are overturned on minor things such as a statement that is made in court that likely should not have been or the appeals court decides a judge allowed something into evidence that they believe was prejudice against the defendant. Sure there are the cases that are overturned from blatant disregard of the rules of the court made by prosecutors, among other things. Now, to be fair, the case against David Viens has not been overturned as of now and in 2014 the appeals court upheld his co…