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Showing posts from January, 2016

Daniel Wozniak

I began writing this blog in 2012 but it was not until January of 2015 that I decided to take a much more serious approach to it. From 2012 until the beginning of 2015 I had made a total of 88 postings.  I decided I was going to make it my goal to spend at least one day a week, preferably Sunday, to devote to research and postings.  I did fairly well considering I made 85 entries in 2015.  For the most part I obviously met my goal of at least one post a week on average.  Some weeks I spent more than one day, while admittedly there were others that I did not spend any days here working on things.  That has been the case the last few weeks, however, just because I have not posted does not mean I have not looked or found more cases for my ever growing list.  I am a self proclaimed Investigative Discovery (ID) addict.  Sadly however I no longer subscribe to that channel (it was the only channel I wanted in the next much higher priced package) and soon I will not have cable at all.  Howeve…

Roger Keith Coleman

This is a case in which has always fascinated me a bit and yet I cannot say for certain why. It could be because in the end it likely proved to us just how cunning and manipulative a person could be; it could be because if the results had been different I may look at the death penalty different today.  Maybe today it seems more relevant because of all of the media hype surrounding the Steven Avery case.  Just as today people seem to be clamoring for Steven Avery's release (although most simply contend that the investigation and trial were unfair), in the early 1990's the same was going on in the Roger Coleman case. There were petitions asking for his release; he was all over the media, including a cover on Time magazine.  Roger Coleman was the "spokesperson" for innocent convictions (and later executions).  He was the one man everyone was convinced was innocent.  He was the symbol to show the world how flawed the death penalty is.  The problem is, he actually was gui…

Jodi Arias

While researching this case I realized that at the time most of the first trial was going on I had a lot going on in my life and I just was not into this case as much.  Sure I knew the basics such as Jodi Arias was accused of murdering her boyfriend... was he an ex or not.... in his home and she had changed her story more than once.  I may have even known her victims name was Travis Alexander but beyond that I could not have told you a whole lot.  Sure this case was a media sensation because it had a scorned woman, a vicious murder, and a story of kinky sex to boot, but still it had not garnered much of my attention. Sadly, while it does have it's twists and turns and did have a large amount of media coverage, the reality of it is that there was not really a unique situation.  

On June 9, 2008 in Mesa Arizona a group of Travis Alexanders friends went to the home he shared with a few roommates.  Travis was a motivational speaker and a salesman for a legal services company.  He had m…

The William Macumber Case

On May 24, 1962, 20 year old Timothy McKillos and his finance', Joyce Sterrenberg had been driving around in her car near Scottsdale Arizona.  They eventually stopped near an area that was considered to be a "lover's lane" of sorts.  It was here that investigators would later find their bodies laying next to the vehicle with bullet wounds.

It appears the police had little to nothing to go on and by 1974 the case apparently was not only not solved, but not active as there were no leads.  This is when Maricopa County Sheriff's employee, Carol Macumber told investigators that her husband, William, had confessed to the murders recently to her. According to investigators, they looked back at the evidence and found fingerprints belonging to Macumber on some of the evidence and arrested him a week after Carol informing them of his confession.

William was tried for the murders in 1975, convicted and sentenced to two life terms.  The following year his conviction was overtu…

The Steven Avery and Brendan Dassey Case

Whether you are into true crime like myself or not, you nearly have to live under a rock to have not heard about the case in which the new Netflix docudrama Making a Murderer is based.  I of course had heard about it and had limited myself as to what information I read until I got around to seeing the film.  In fact, I had several people contact me to see if I had viewed it yet knowing that it would be right up my alley.  So finally I sat down the other day to watch it knowing very little than the fact that someone had been convicted of a murder in which people seemed to now be clamoring about and proclaiming his innocence.  In my infinite ignorance I did not realize that it was a ten part series and I got up early one morning and began watching before my husband awoke.  I figured I would get a few in and go back to finish it later.  When he woke up I was in the middle of episode four. My husband is not always into the cases as I am but there are a few that have caught his eye and thi…